English 9 and English 10 Priority List – Week of 8/29 – 9/2

Happy Monday, Monarchs!

Click on the title of this post to see your priority list for the week. The English 9 priority list is first, and the English 10 priority list is second. Remember: if you are absent, I expect you to refer to this priority list for your make-up work! Be sure to get your work turned in within two days of your return to class. If you missed a quiz, email me at kelly.hayes@aps.edu to make an appointment to make up your quiz during lunch or after school. Click “continue” to see your priority list for the week! 

English 9 – Periods 2, 6 and 7

Essential Question: How can our words, both written and verbal, affect others?

Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 10.03.56 AMMonday, 8/29: Read “Desiderata” on page seventeen of the green textbooks. As you read, keep a dialectical journal of quotes related to the essential question in the dialectical journal section of your notebook.

Tuesday and Wednesday, 8/30-31: Read “The Giant’s House” on page nine of the green textbooks. As you read, keep a dialectical journal of quotes related to the essential question in the dialectical journal section of your notebook. Homework: Write an eleven-sentence paragraph that answers the essential question, “How can our words, both written and verbal, affect others?” You must use evidence from “Desiderata” and “The Giant’s House” to support your claims. 

Thursday and Friday, 9/1-2: Embedding evidence notes – revise your paragraph to correctly embed evidence into your notes.

English 10 – Periods 3 and 4

Essential Question: How can you make your sentences more detailed and more specific?

Monday, 8/29: Work with a partner or small group to make instructional posters that teach different parts of a sentence. Your instructional poster must have the following criteria:

  • A visual scaffold showing students how to use your assigned component.
  • Necessary definitions using student-friendly language.
  • At least two examples of your component being used correctly.
  • At least one example of your component being used incorrectly.
  • A “Misconception Alert” that corrects common mistakes.

Tuesday and Wednesday, 8/30-8/31: Continue learning how to write interesting sentences by taking Cornell notes on phrases. Watch the video below for your notes.

Once you’ve finished taking notes, take the time to chunk, question, summarize, and highlight your notes. It may be helpful to check out this post on phrases. Your exit-ticket is to write seven sentences:

  1. One sentence with an appositive phrase
  2. One sentence with a participial phrase
  3. One sentence with an absolute phrase
  4. One simple sentence (with no phrases)
  5. One compound sentence (with no phrases)
  6. One complex sentence (with no phrases)
  7. One compound-complex sentence (with no phrases)

Thursday and Friday, 9/1-9/2: Apply your understanding of basic sentence structure and phrases by analyzing sentences from “Tepeyac” on page 104 in the purple textbooks. Then, mimic Cisneros’ style by writing a sentence about your bedroom.

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