Priority List: 9/19 – 9/23

Happy Monday, Monarchs!

Click on the title of this post to see your priority list for the week. The English 9 priority list is first, and the English 10 priority list is second. Remember: if you are absent, I expect you to refer to this priority list for your make-up work! Be sure to get your work turned in within two days of your return to class. If you missed a quiz, email me at kelly.hayes@aps.edu to make an appointment to make up your quiz during lunch or after school. 

English 9

Essential Question: How do authors create situational irony in a story?

Monday, 9/19: Vocabulary Day! 

  1. First, you need to make an account in Schoology and sign up for your appropriate course. After signing up, please take a moment to write your username and password onto the Important Internet Information page of your notebook. The course join codes are below:
    • 2nd Period: 949DQ-XK9W4
    • 6th Period: PQQHF-PZNJJ
    • 7th Period: XJC7P-3D7DK
  2. Take your vocabulary quiz using Schoology. You may not talk to another student as you take your quiz or as they take their quiz. You may not use your notes.
  3. Once you’ve finished taking your vocabulary quiz, please go to All Things Vocabulary Week Two to find your new words for the week.
  4. If you have not already done so, you may also work on your Indulging Curiosities Research Paper for the rest of the period. This paper is due at the end of class! Check out the video below to make sure you’ve used MLA formatting properly with Google Docs. Be sure to share your GoogleDoc with me so I can grade it! Just click the “share” button in the top right corner, and type in my email address: kelly.hayes@aps.edu. You only need to do this once. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, 9/20-9/21: Introduction to Short Story Unit

  1. Notes: Plot Structure Diagram, Foreshadowing, and Irony
  2. Read “The Stolen Party” on page 107 of the Springboard textbook.
    • Dialectical Journal essential question: How do authors provide clues about what will happen next in a story?
    • Your journal must have three pieces of evidence and three pieces of commentary
  3. Foreshadowing Discussion: How did the foreshadowing in “The Stolen Party” impact the irony at the end of the story?
  4. Homework Due 9/22/16: Chart “The Stolen Party” on a Plot Structure Diagram in your notes

Thursday and Friday, 9/22-9/23: Read “The Necklace”

  1. Revisit the definitions from yesterday:
    • Plot Structure Diagram (exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution)
    • Foreshadowing
    • Irony (situational, dramatic, verbal)
  2. Read “The Necklace” on page 332 of the green textbooks.
    • Dialectical journal essential question: How do authors create situational irony within a story?
    • Your journal must have three pieces of evidence and three pieces of commentary
  3. Discussion: How is the ending of “The Necklace” ironic? How does this compare to the irony in “The Stolen Party?”
  4. Timed Writing: Write an 11 sentence paragraph answering the essential question: How do authors create situational irony within a story? Use evidence from both “The Stolen Party” and “The Necklace” to support your answer. This is due at the end of the period.

English 10

Essential Question: How does Steinbeck capture the truth of human nature? 

Monday, 9/19: Vocabulary Day! 

  1. First, you need to make an account in Schoology and sign up for your appropriate course. After signing up, please take a moment to write your username and password onto the Important Internet Information page of your notebook. The course join codes are below:
    • 3rd Period: Q5HGH-ZGSZC
    • 4th Period: MK8BS-MGN74
  2. Take your vocabulary quiz using Schoology. You may not talk to another student as you take your quiz or as they take their quiz. You may not use your notes.
  3. Once you’ve finished taking your vocabulary quiz, please go to All Things Vocabulary Week Two to find your new words for the week.
  4. If you have not already done so, you may also work on your Adolescent Issues Research Paper for the rest of the period. This paper is due at the beginning of class on Tuesday, 9/20 or Wednesday, 9/21! Check out the video below to make sure you’ve used MLA formatting properly with Google Docs. Before you leave today, be sure to share your GoogleDoc with me so I can grade it! Just click the “share” button in the top right corner, and type in my email address: kelly.hayes@aps.edu. You only need to do this once, and I won’t grade your document until after the due date. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, 9/20-9/21: The Pearl Chapters 1 and 2

  1. Define parable in the English Class Glossary section of the interactive notebook
  2. Read chapters one and two of The Pearl by John Steinbeck
    • Dialectical journal essential question: How does Steinbeck introduce and develop unique characters with conflicting motivations?
    • You must have two pieces of evidence and two pieces of commentary per chapter: four of each by the end of the day
  3. Discuss the following topics:
    • Steinbeck’s character development
    • Purpose and role of Kino’s songs
    • Cultural identification: background and setting
    • The Pearl as a parable

Thursday and Friday, 9/22-9/23The Pearl Chapter 3

  1. Notes: How to Write Level Three Questions: A Three Step Process
  2. Read chapter three of The Pearl by John Steinbeck
    • Dialectical journal essential question: How does Steinbeck capture the truth of human nature? 
    • Your journal must have three quotes and three commentaries
  3. Discuss: What different concepts are starting to occur within the novel? How do the characters point us to these concepts? How does this help us to answer the essential question: How does Steinbeck capture the truth of human nature?
  4. Homework Due Tuesday, 9/27/16: Use the Frayer Model handout (given out in class) to explore how Steinbeck is developing an observation about an abstract concept from The Pearl.

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