Priority List: 1/9 – 1/13

Greetings, Monarchs!

Click on the title of this post to see your priority list for the week. The English 9 priority list is first, and the English 10 priority list is second. Remember: if you are absent, I expect you to refer to this priority list for your make-up work! Be sure to get your work turned in within two days of your return to class. If you missed a quiz, email me at kelly.dutro@aps.edu to make an appointment to make up your quiz during lunch or after school.

English 9

Essential Question: What is the relationship between corruption and deception?

Monday, 1/9: A Day Schedule due to Friday’s Snow Day!

Please watch “The Last Lecture” below. Take Cornell notes as you watch the video. Your essential question for the Cornell notes is: How does “The Last Lecture” apply to my personal and academic success?”

Tuesday and Wednesday, 1/10-1/11: Introduction to Allegory

We will spend the period discussing the differences between allegories and symbolism using Dr. Seuss’ “Yertle the Turtle.” Find the notes on Allegory and Symbolism on page three of Animal Farm Supplemental Resources.

As you watch the video, consider how this story might symbolically or figuratively represent real events from history. As a class, we will the outline for an analytical paragraph explaining how the story is an allegory for Hitler’s regime.

Thursday and Friday, 1/12-1/13: The Lorax as an Allegory

The last time we met we analyzed how Dr. Seuss’ short story, “Yertle the Turtle” is an allegory for Adolf Hitler. Today, you will exercise the same skills by writing an eleven-sentence critical analysis paragraph explaining how “The Lorax” is also an allegory for something else.

As you watch the video above, fill out the Allegory Analysis Sheet. Then, on the back of the sheet or on a separate piece of paper, outline an eleven-sentence critical analysis paragraph explaining how “The Lorax” is an allegory. Finally, write your final draft in the space provided on the sheet.

English 10

Essential Question: What is the relationship between censorship and oppression 

Monday, 1/9: A Day Schedule due to Friday’s Snow Day!

Please watch “The Last Lecture” below. Take Cornell notes as you watch the video. Your essential question for the Cornell notes is: How does “The Last Lecture” apply to my personal and academic success?”

Tuesday and Wednesday, 1/10-1/11: Baseline Revision

We will spend the first half of the period reading the rest of the article, “The Symbiotic Relationship between Western Media and Terrorism” by Javier Delgado Rivera from your baseline assessment last week. Then, we will write a class baseline assessment on the same prompt.

Tomorrow, you will need to write another eleven-sentence critical analysis paragraph showing improvement from your baseline assessments.

Thursday and Friday, 1/12-1/13: Introduction to Satire with Jonathan Swift

First, watch the Danielle Webber’s “Introduction to Satire” below. As always, take Cornell notes as you watch and make sure to have each device in your notes.

Essential Question: How can I identify and understand the elements of satire in literary works?

When you’ve finished your notes, pick up a copy of Jonathan Swift’s poem, “A Satirical Elegy on the Death of a Famous General.”

Poem Directions: First, annotate this poem for at least three of the satirical devices from the video. Then, write an eleven sentence paragraph explaining how Jonathan Swift used satire to communicate his message to the reader. Your paragraph is due at the end of the period.

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